Wednesday, May 28, 2014
ecowatchorg:

Mounting Climate Evidence Underscores the Need to Act
Some see climate change as a distant threat, if they see it as a threat at all. But the scientific evidence is overwhelming: climate change is here, and unless we curb behaviors that contribute to it, it will get worse, putting our food, air, water and security at risk.
SEE MORE:
http://ecowatch.com/2014/05/27/climate-evidence-need-to-act/

ecowatchorg:

Mounting Climate Evidence Underscores the Need to Act

Some see climate change as a distant threat, if they see it as a threat at all. But the scientific evidence is overwhelming: climate change is here, and unless we curb behaviors that contribute to it, it will get worse, putting our food, air, water and security at risk.

SEE MORE:

http://ecowatch.com/2014/05/27/climate-evidence-need-to-act/

40,000 Detroit Buildings to Go

New blight report recommends demolition of 40,000 buildings and rethinking of many more abandoned and city-owned parcels. That’s a big challenge and a world of opportunity.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/28/us/detroit-task-force-says-blight-cleanup-will-cost-850-million.html?hp&_r=0

Friday, May 16, 2014
Driving costs drivers so much less than it costs society Jeff Speck, Walkable City (via fuckyeahurbandesign)
sprawlnation:

No, Bike Lanes Don’t Cause Crazy Congestion
While they do increase congestion, the effect is minimal. The Fast Company article does stress that roads should be selected based on their existing design in order to deal with the realities of car reliant cities. Pushing to hard to make bike lanes work in less pedestrian freindly areas could have detreminal effects. Congestion that slows emergency responsiveness is an example.
While the article is light on content, the headline alone is enough of an eye-grabber to start a conversation about when, where and how fast, bike lanes appear on our roadways.

sprawlnation:

No, Bike Lanes Don’t Cause Crazy Congestion

While they do increase congestion, the effect is minimal. The Fast Company article does stress that roads should be selected based on their existing design in order to deal with the realities of car reliant cities. Pushing to hard to make bike lanes work in less pedestrian freindly areas could have detreminal effects. Congestion that slows emergency responsiveness is an example.

While the article is light on content, the headline alone is enough of an eye-grabber to start a conversation about when, where and how fast, bike lanes appear on our roadways.

urbnist:

Build Better Cities, day in and day out. 
Let’s get to work. 

urbnist:

Build Better Cities, day in and day out. 

Let’s get to work. 

astudyinmovement:

A Cartoonist’s Vision of a Car-Free Future - Stephanie Garlock - The Atlantic Cities
Glorious cartoons on notions of urban density, transit, etc.
bookpickings:

Letters of Note: An Eclectic Collection of Correspondence Deserving of a Wider Audience
Shaun Usher

"As long as there is one upright man, as long as there is one compassionate woman, the contagion may spread and the scene is not desolate. Hope is the thing that is left to us, in a bad time… Hang on to your hat. Hang on to your hope. And wind the clock, for tomorrow is another day."

E.B. White’s beautiful letter to a man who had lost faith in humanity:

bookpickings:

Letters of Note: An Eclectic Collection of Correspondence Deserving of a Wider Audience

Shaun Usher

"As long as there is one upright man, as long as there is one compassionate woman, the contagion may spread and the scene is not desolate. Hope is the thing that is left to us, in a bad time… Hang on to your hat. Hang on to your hope. And wind the clock, for tomorrow is another day."

E.B. White’s beautiful letter to a man who had lost faith in humanity: