Thursday, March 28, 2013
My original copy is held together with an elastic band. I love this book and have learned so much from Jacobs. 

davidsshelf:

The Death and Life of Great American Cities
Jane Jacobs
The Death and Life of Great American Cities was described by The New York Times as “perhaps the most influential single work in the history of town planning… . [It] can also be seen in a much larger context. It is first of all a work of literature; the descriptions of street life as a kind of ballet and the bitingly satiric account of traditional planning theory can still be read for pleasure even by those who long ago absorbed and appropriated the book’s arguments.” Jane Jacobs, an editor and writer on architecture in New York City in the early sixties, argued that urban diversity and vitality were being destroyed by powerful architects and city planners. Rigorous, sane, and delightfully epigrammatic, Jane Jacobs’s tour de force is a blueprint for the humanistic management of cities. It remains sensible, knowledgeable, readable, and indispensable.

My original copy is held together with an elastic band. I love this book and have learned so much from Jacobs.

davidsshelf:

The Death and Life of Great American Cities

Jane Jacobs

The Death and Life of Great American Cities was described by The New York Times as “perhaps the most influential single work in the history of town planning… . [It] can also be seen in a much larger context. It is first of all a work of literature; the descriptions of street life as a kind of ballet and the bitingly satiric account of traditional planning theory can still be read for pleasure even by those who long ago absorbed and appropriated the book’s arguments.” Jane Jacobs, an editor and writer on architecture in New York City in the early sixties, argued that urban diversity and vitality were being destroyed by powerful architects and city planners. Rigorous, sane, and delightfully epigrammatic, Jane Jacobs’s tour de force is a blueprint for the humanistic management of cities. It remains sensible, knowledgeable, readable, and indispensable.

smartercities:

What if a 10-year-old designed a city? | GreenBiz
A big part of making something smarter is asking the right “what if” questions to the right set of people. A smarter city is less about what technology, and more about how technology is applied in order to make a positive impact in people’s lives. In defining what it takes to make a city smarter, it is important to start with those that live and work and go to school in a city.

smartercities:

What if a 10-year-old designed a city? | GreenBiz

A big part of making something smarter is asking the right “what if” questions to the right set of people. A smarter city is less about what technology, and more about how technology is applied in order to make a positive impact in people’s lives. In defining what it takes to make a city smarter, it is important to start with those that live and work and go to school in a city.

Tuesday, December 18, 2012 Monday, December 10, 2012 Thursday, November 29, 2012 Wednesday, November 28, 2012
Hurricane Sandy reminded us that cities are where climate change crashes into everyday life. But the news isn’t all bad—this remarkable little book shows how the future of the planet depends on building better cities and the kind of new thinking we need to get started. Read Carbon Zero right away, because time is short. Bill McKibben (via carbonzerocities)

How to cure traffic jams.

Monday, November 5, 2012
How ready is your city for massive flooding? Here’s one reason why I study leadership in the context of climate change and urbanization: it is leadership (or lack thereof) that stands between us and the next disaster.
Nice article in The Atlantic.

How ready is your city for massive flooding? Here’s one reason why I study leadership in the context of climate change and urbanization: it is leadership (or lack thereof) that stands between us and the next disaster.

Nice article in The Atlantic.